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Supplementary Figures: Design and characterization of a 3D-printed staggered herringbone mixer

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posted on 18.05.2021, 08:37 by Megan Valentine, Vedika Shenoy, Chelsea Edwards, Matthew Helgeson

Supplementary Figures:

Fig. S1 (A-D) SHM with design dimensions of w= 100 µm and d = 100 µm was characterized using the Keyence microscope. (A) and (B) are image outputs from the Keyence microscope and (C) and (D) show corresponding measured height traces at the location of the solid line in (A) and (B) respectively. Measured height profile demonstrates that herringbones are almost entirely fused together. (D) SHM with design dimensions of w= 100 µm and d = 300 µm. Measured height profile demonstrates herringbones that retained their distinct grooves; note that printed spacing between herringbones are approximately 220 µm, making them noticeably smaller than the design dimensions. This is a result of printer inaccuracies at smaller length scales and can be corrected through printer calibration (see Fig S2.) Panels (E-H) highlight common irregularities observed in printed channels patterned with herringbones. (E) and (F) are image outputs from the Keyence microscope and (G) and (H) show corresponding measured height traces at the location of the solid line in (E) and (F) respectively. These irregularities include missing portions of herringbones in (E), or additional smaller ridges present between herringbones in (F). These irregularities are highlighted with red bounding boxes in (G) and (H), and appear at random positions across prints.

Fig. S2 – Calibration curves enable accurate printing of heights and widths. To account for systematic deviations between the design dimensions and printed dimensions, a series of structures were designed, printed and measured. Upper panels represent calibration curves constructed for printed heights (left) and widths (right). In each panel, the input design dimensions are plotted versus the measured dimensions of the printed parts. A linear relationship was found and the data fitted to produce a calibration equation that enabled calculation of the design dimensions (‘inputs’) that would yield desired printed dimensions. The accuracy of this calibration procedure is shown in the lower panels. The design dimensions (‘inputs’, blue circles) and the actual printed dimensions (red squares) were plotted against the desired dimensions, for both the height and width. The dashed line in the lower panels represents the ideal case (where the measured and desired dimensions are equal).

Fig. S3 - Schematic of channel patterned with all 5 SHM cycles. Channel is designed to be switched back on itself to reduce the occupied space on chip and to abide by the size constraints of the Miicraft printer. Red boxes indicate the regions of the channel after each cycle of SHM (1-5) where the flow patterns were observed to determine the degree of mixing after each cycle of SHM.

Fig. S4 Intensity profiles for each cycle at varying Pe, which were generated by averaging and smoothing the intensity data from 50 rows of pixels at each position across the width of the channel.

Fig.S5 Comparison of CV values for each cycle for Device 1 (red circles) and Device 2 (Blue squares) at varying Pe.


Funding

This work was supported by the MRSEC Program of the National Science Foundation under Award No. DMR 1720256 (IRG-3). The authors acknowledge the use of the Microfluidics Laboratory within the California NanoSystems Institute, supported by the University of California, Santa Barbara and the University of California, Office of the President. We thank David Bothman and Daniel Magnuson for technical assistance with printing. VJS acknowledges support of the MRSEC-sponsored RISE and FLAM programs. CERE also acknowledges support from the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship program

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